Vegetable Gardening

About Vegetable Gardening

How To Grow An Organic Garden As A Part Of A Healthy Lifestyle

What are your personal thoughts on organic gardening? Do you view everything you can on the subject, and try to improve upon your own garden? There are numerous resources available such as magazines, videos, books, shows, etc. So where do you begin with your own techniques? Try going through these tips to find your starting point.

Be sure to test your soil before you plant your garden, if you want to be successful without the need for chemicals. A home testing kit can tell you the pH of your soil, which indicates the likelihood of plant survival. A vegetable garden requires a pH of about 6.5; if your soil is off, you can supplement before your plants start to die.

Create soil for your organic garden by composting. Composting is a wonderful way to re-use some items that you would normally throw away as garbage. It also provides for rich and fertile soil, without the use of chemicals and pesticides. Compost bins are available in many sizes to fit your specific needs.

Learn to water your garden efficiently. A soaker hose can be laid in the garden and left on with low water pressure. This frees you up from having to hand-water the plants, so you can do other gardening work. Take care with seedlings, though — they are still delicate and need to be watered by hand.

Use mulch to fertilize your beds. You have to make sure you spread mulch evenly, as you need a certain quantity and do not want to waste any of it. Sprinkle mulch as best as you can and use a rack to spread it flatly and evenly. Make sure you cover all the areas that need it.

Pine needles make a great organic mulch. Some garden plants have a higher acidity, and prefer a more acidic soil. Pine needles are an excellent form of mulch for these types of plants. Spread a few inches of pine needles on your organic beds so that it will put the acid into your soil.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

Making rich, organic compost for your garden doesn’t take special equipment. All you really need to do is dump your kitchen scraps, lawn trimmings and leaves in a pile, and let nature take its course. It may take a bit longer, but in the end you’ll have a rich, healthy compost.

Before you begin planting in your garden, it’s a good idea to test your soil’s acidity first. Home testing kits are readily available. Your soil should have a pH around 6.5 for most vegetables. If the pH is too low, you can boost it by spreading lime. If it’s too high, you can use powdered sulfur.

Now that you have an idea on where to start crafting your own organic gardening techniques are you ready to start experimenting? Are you ready to apply what you read to your garden? Can you help your garden grow properly? If you can, then have fun! If not, make sure to review the tips again.

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